AudioStream

  1. As a UK expat the folk tradition of the British Isles is very close to my heart and while many dismiss much of this music as arch, twee or "finger in the ear" caterwauling it is in fact a very vibrant and dynamic tradition and one with a wealth of beautiful tunes to offer. The selection I’ve made below will hopefully illustrate some of the range and diversity of this genre while also hopefully throwing up one or two new selections for most listeners—enjoy!
  2. I was in our NY office and I asked Robert Baird, Stereophile's Music Editor, "Have you heard the new Iron & Wine? It's really nice, very easy to like." Robert responded that he hadn't listened to it yet so I added, "Some reviewers have said it may be too easy to like." To which Robert responded with a sigh of a sentence as if he's heard this way too many times, "Is anything really too easy to like?" I like Robert.
  3. It's hard to believe that over three years has passed since I last reviewed a Wyred 4 Sound DAC. At that time, I found the DAC-2 DSDse to have "flawless function and performance that was a joy to experience." I now found myself very curious to see what E.J. Sarmento has come up with for today's computer audiophile. For those of you that aren't acquainted with E. J. Sarmento's California company, Wyred 4 Sound not only builds DACs, but offers power amps, preamps, integrated amps, music servers, along with cables and numerous accessories for the audiophile marketplace. The DAC-2v2 SE is Wyred 4 Sound's latest design that builds on their DAC-2v2 by adding many improvements to the basic design.
  4. Public Enemy: It Takes A Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back (1988)
    File Under: old-school, mind-altering, radical hip-hop
    It came caterwauling out the windows of passing Old's 98's, screeching and scratching with abstract samples of James Brown's funk and Coltrane sped up until he sounded like a siren wailing, Slayer's and Anthrax's buzzsaw guitars, with trunk bass booming enough to rattle the windows in my first floor apartment; it's vibe was aggressive, menacing and overtly political as it spread bespoke: passed hand-to-hand on bootleg cassettes, many recorded directly over something else, hitting the streets before it's official release date in June of 1988; it was a revolution that was not televised and, at least in the beginning, took place virtually outside the structure of the mainstream system of distribution of record stores, radio, television and magazines, or MTV, a radical collage of black sounds that was suddenly everywhere at once, a viral social-cultural and political experience spreading its message across the city where most white people like myself only felt it but didn't really get it.
  5. Photo: Stephen Mejias. Design: Todd Steponick, Nice Looking Designs

    Track 21

    Mrs. Little is often amused by my complete inability to understand even the simplest lyrics to even the poppiest of pop songs—lyrics that are to her, and, I assume, so many others, as clear as a September sky.

  6. Shout out to this website for leading me to a number of my favorite albums. Here are some that hopefully haven’t been mentioned here before (all available on Tidal).
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